Where’s the Wildlife? – March

Clouds passing over Teton Mountains after sunrise

Bald Eagles

Bald eagles will not have changed much in terms of behavior in the last couple of months, so look for them along rivers such as the Snake and Gros Ventre Rivers.

A bald eagle flying over a break in the ice and snow

Beavers and Otters

With increasing snowpack beavers and otters will be difficult to find, though otters can still be found where winter’s grip has loosened a bit thanks to warming temperatures.… Keep reading...

Where’s the Wildlife – February

Heavy wind blowing snow over Jackson Hole

On most years, February is the snowiest month, solidifying winter’s grip by blanketing the landscape with poundings of snow. If wildlife wasn’t struggling by this point, they will be now. Though temperatures have warmed up slightly from January, the end of winter still feels like it’s way out of reach.

Bald Eagles

Bald eagles are frequently seen flying along the Snake River and its tributary, the Gros Ventre River.… Keep reading...

Where’s the Wildlife? – January

January and the new year usher in typically dry weather and blistering cold. This creates a lot of great opportunity for frigid portraits of wildlife, as well as landscapes in a deep freeze. Most of the hunting in the area has ended by this time, so many animals have returned to their more natural habits and comfortable habitats.… Keep reading...

Where’s the Wildlife? – December

December sunrise on the Teton Mountains

December months generally reinforce the cold that moves in from November, solidifying winter in Jackson Hole, Wyoming and Grand Teton National Park, both literally and metaphorically. Many animals are now ending fall migrations, and making last minute preparations for the season.

Bald Eagles

Bald eagles are relatively easy to find this time of year thanks to elk hunts occurring in both nearby national forests, as well as Grand Teton National Park.… Keep reading...

What’s the Difference Between a National Park and a National Monument?

Calf Creek Canyon in Grandstaircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah

As someone whose living is based on Grand Teton National Park, I’m frequently asked what the difference between a national park and a national monument is. It’s a very good question. Both are operated by the National Park Service, vary in size, have beautiful sites, and frequently wildlife worth seeing, or at the least, protecting.… Keep reading...